Veranstaltung

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SYMPOSIUM – The Body and the Built Environment in the Long Nineteenth Century

Datum
25. Juni Juni 2019 

The peri­od between 1750 and 1918 is wide­ly acknowl­edged to have been one of dra­mat­ic soci­etal and cul­tur­al change, not least in terms of people’s expe­ri­ence of the spaces in which they lived. The unpar­al­leled urban­i­sa­tion that took place over the course of the long nine­teenth cen­tu­ry neces­si­tat­ed new ways of exist­ing in increas­ing­ly built up envi­ron­ments. The move to such loca­tions demand­ed new habits, rou­tines, and modes of move­ment, all of which had a dis­cernible impact on the body. As Eliz­a­beth Grosz points out, ‘through exer­cise and habit­u­al pat­terns of move­ment, through nego­ti­at­ing its envi­ron­ment whether this be rur­al or urban […] [that] the body is more or less marked, con­sti­tut­ed as appro­pri­ate, or, as the case may be, an inap­pro­pri­ate body for its cul­tur­al require­ments’ (1994). Where, for exam­ple, the nav­i­ga­tion of uneven rur­al ter­rain would have strength­ened cer­tain mus­cles, the nego­ti­a­tion of flat, urban streets pro­duced a marked­ly dif­fer­ent body. Beyond the pure­ly mus­cu­lar lev­el, the count­less cul­tur­al ele­ments of the nine­teenth cen­tu­ry city also impact­ed in numer­ous ways upon the embod­ied subject.

This one-day inter­dis­ci­pli­nary sym­po­sium invites papers that explore how the shift­ing rela­tion­ship between the body and the built envi­ron­ment was inter­ro­gat­ed in lit­er­a­ture and cul­ture of the long nine­teenth cen­tu­ry. The sym­po­sium aims to stim­u­late aca­d­e­m­ic dis­cus­sion on a range of top­ics relat­ing to embod­i­ment and archi­tec­tur­al space in the peri­od rang­ing from 1750–1920. As such, we wel­come papers from those work­ing in the fields of Lit­er­a­ture, His­to­ry, Med­ical Human­i­ties, Geog­ra­phy, Archi­tec­ture, Phi­los­o­phy, Film and Media, Psy­chol­o­gy, Mod­ern Lan­guages, Gender/Women’s Stud­ies, Law, and Politics.

Paper top­ics might include, but are not lim­it­ed to, con­sid­er­a­tions of: ques­tions of own­er­ship and access; health; urban plan­ning; ago­ra­pho­bia and oth­er spa­tial­ly relat­ed dis­or­ders; sen­so­ry per­cep­tion; the dis­eased body; polic­ing, sur­veil­lance, and pub­lic order/disorder; san­i­ta­tion and pol­lu­tion; and phe­nom­e­no­log­i­cal approach­es to the body and space.

Poten­tial research ques­tions might include:

-        In what ways did the built envi­ron­ment either encour­age or pre­clude access to cer­tain kinds of bod­ies in the long nine­teenth century?

-        How was the rela­tion­ship between the embod­ied sub­ject and archi­tec­tur­al space inter­ro­gat­ed in lit­er­a­ture and cul­ture of the period?

-        What impact did sci­en­tif­ic and med­ical advances in the under­stand­ing of the human body have on the con­struc­tion and/or organ­i­sa­tion of the built environment?

Please send abstracts of 250 words for 20-minute papers to: bodybuiltenvironment@gmail.com by 17 May 2019. For fur­ther details, vis­it: http://bodybuiltenvironment.wordpress.com

 

This event is sup­port­ed by the Cen­tre for Nine­teenth Cen­tu­ry Stud­ies, and is pre­sent­ed in asso­ci­a­tion with the Insti­tute for Med­ical Human­i­ties at Durham University.

 


The peri­od between 1750 and 1918 is wide­ly acknowl­edged to have been one of dra­mat­ic soci­etal and cul­tur­al change, not least in terms of people’s expe­ri­ence of the spaces in which they lived. The unpar­al­leled urban­i­sa­tion that took place over the course of the long nine­teenth cen­tu­ry neces­si­tat­ed new ways of exist­ing in increas­ing­ly built up envi­ron­ments. The move to such loca­tions demand­ed new habits, rou­tines, and modes of move­ment, all of which had a dis­cernible impact on the body. As Eliz­a­beth Grosz points out, ‘through exer­cise and habit­u­al pat­terns of move­ment, through nego­ti­at­ing its envi­ron­ment whether this be rur­al or urban […] [that] the body is more or less marked, con­sti­tut­ed as appro­pri­ate, or, as the case may be, an inap­pro­pri­ate body for its cul­tur­al require­ments’ (1994). Where, for exam­ple, the nav­i­ga­tion of uneven rur­al ter­rain would have strength­ened cer­tain mus­cles, the nego­ti­a­tion of flat, urban streets pro­duced a marked­ly dif­fer­ent body. Beyond the pure­ly mus­cu­lar lev­el, the count­less cul­tur­al ele­ments of the nine­teenth cen­tu­ry city also impact­ed in numer­ous ways upon the embod­ied subject.

This one-day inter­dis­ci­pli­nary sym­po­sium invites papers that explore how the shift­ing rela­tion­ship between the body and the built envi­ron­ment was inter­ro­gat­ed in lit­er­a­ture and cul­ture of the long nine­teenth cen­tu­ry. The sym­po­sium aims to stim­u­late aca­d­e­m­ic dis­cus­sion on a range of top­ics relat­ing to embod­i­ment and archi­tec­tur­al space in the peri­od rang­ing from 1750–1920. As such, we wel­come papers from those work­ing in the fields of Lit­er­a­ture, His­to­ry, Med­ical Human­i­ties, Geog­ra­phy, Archi­tec­ture, Phi­los­o­phy, Film and Media, Psy­chol­o­gy, Mod­ern Lan­guages, Gender/Women’s Stud­ies, Law, and Politics.

Paper top­ics might include, but are not lim­it­ed to, con­sid­er­a­tions of: ques­tions of own­er­ship and access; health; urban plan­ning; ago­ra­pho­bia and oth­er spa­tial­ly relat­ed dis­or­ders; sen­so­ry per­cep­tion; the dis­eased body; polic­ing, sur­veil­lance, and pub­lic order/disorder; san­i­ta­tion and pol­lu­tion; and phe­nom­e­no­log­i­cal approach­es to the body and space.

Poten­tial research ques­tions might include:

-        In what ways did the built envi­ron­ment either encour­age or pre­clude access to cer­tain kinds of bod­ies in the long nine­teenth century?

-        How was the rela­tion­ship between the embod­ied sub­ject and archi­tec­tur­al space inter­ro­gat­ed in lit­er­a­ture and cul­ture of the period?

-        What impact did sci­en­tif­ic and med­ical advances in the under­stand­ing of the human body have on the con­struc­tion and/or organ­i­sa­tion of the built environment?

Please send abstracts of 250 words for 20-minute papers to: bodybuiltenvironment@gmail.com by 17 May 2019. For fur­ther details, vis­it: http://bodybuiltenvironment.wordpress.com

 

This event is sup­port­ed by the Cen­tre for Nine­teenth Cen­tu­ry Stud­ies, and is pre­sent­ed in asso­ci­a­tion with the Insti­tute for Med­ical Human­i­ties at Durham University.